Nutrition

Making resolutions that work!

If you’ve been reading headlines like “New Year, New You!” then you need to read this! 
It is the time of year when we get inspired to make big changes, alter our habits, commit to a healthy routine and finally get a handle on everything we need to get a handle on! But why, oh why, after so many years on this planet have we not quite got it all figured out yet? Believe it or not, there is a right way to enact lasting change and it is SO easy!

Start with something small and actionable (this means that you can make it happen). At this point, baby steps are the right choice:  if you surpass your goal, you can make a new one in March or June. Here’s an example (see more with the photos below)- “I will move my body every day” is a great and easy to accomplish goal that is simple to build on throughout the year. For example, if your goal seems too easy a few weeks in, you can alter it to “I will move my body 20 minutes every day”. Every affirmation or resolution that you make should be posted physically in a location you see every day, like on your bathroom mirror (chalk markers or post it notes!) and you should say it out loud to increase its effectiveness.

If you feel like you need more help getting the year off to a great start, Dr. Katja Magus specializes in lifestyle transformation- helping you make the changes you need to feel healthy and happy in the New Year.

Check out our affirmation and resolution examples (with photos!) below 🙂

“I will eat more vegetables” is a much more effective affirmation or resolution than “I will give up sugar”- which conjures up all sorts of deprivation and sadness….who wants to “give up” stuff anyway?

” I will move my body every day” is a great resolution that is easy to accomplish…much more effective than saying “I will lose this flab”….body positive messages always WIN!

 

“I am going to start the year pain free” is an example of an awesome affirmation that we wholly approve of. See you soon!

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Walnuts and Your Brain

Many people like to add walnuts to food to add some zest and a little crunchy kick, but walnuts are much more than a flavor additive, as they are chock full of healthy properties and have been used in Asia as an overall health tonic and brain booster for years. Let’s take a nutty look at walnuts.     continue reading »

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Eating According to TCM: Five Foods for Spring

Spring is a time of renewal, regeneration, growth and energy. The plants and animals awaken from the slumber of the cold winter months. The vital nutrients that have been stored in the roots of the plants and the bodies of the animals, comes to the surface and life becomes more vibrant and fluid. Human beings are no different. Humans tend to stay indoors more during the winter months and sometimes pack on a little extra weight in the process. As the weather warms, humans become more gregarious and spend more time outside enjoying nature. This is just a natural process. continue reading »

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Fermented Foods and Intestinal Health

fermented food for digestive healthThe modern world is changing every single day. Because of this constant state of change, our bodies are frequently having to adjust. We have a food supply being degraded and depleted of nutritional content, which in turn, causes our bodies to become depleted. Our soil and water is contaminated with antibiotics and deadly fertilizers. All of which become part of the food chain we rely upon. Because of this, antibiotics are failing and superbugs like MRSA are on the rise. Lack of nutrition and the overuse of antibiotics are just a couple of the things wreaking havoc on our intestinal health. But there are ways to combat this and keep the gut healthy. continue reading »

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Acupuncture: Not Just Needles

Cupping AcupunctureMost people have heard of the field of acupuncture by now, but did you realize the scope of the practice encompasses Chinese medicine, which includes so much more than needles? Let’s explore this ancient therapy.

First of all, the practice of Chinese medicine starts with a diagnosis. The practitioner asks many questions to build a history; this includes the answers to digestion, appetite, diet, sleep patterns, bowel movement urination, pain, lifestyle, and stress level, for example. The acupuncturist will also be noting the voice pitch, hair luster, skin color and tone, as well as posture and mood of the patient and any significant odor. After that, there is a pulse and tongue analysis to determine where the pattern and root are, primarily. Finally, blood pressure is measured and other applicable tests done, including palpation of the body. After this history, a diagnosis and treatment plan is determined. What might be included in this plan? continue reading »

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